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tv   News  Al Jazeera  February 16, 2014 6:00am-9:01am EST

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>> we are so very happy to have just a little bit of closure. >> murder mistrial, a jury convicts michael dunn of attempted murder putting florida's stand your ground law back in the spotlight again. >> and chaos in caracas. anti-government protesters clash with police. thousands ral i in support of the -- rally in support of
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venezuela president. >> we have black holes in our hearts. >> korean families ripped apart by war hope to see love said ones again >> "black hole" gets best film at the berlin film festival. >> good morning to you and welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live from new york city. >> michael dunn, potentially facing a life behind bars. he's the white man accused of killing an unarmed black teen during an argument over the teen's loud music. a florida jury found dunn guilty of three counts of attempted murder. jurors are divided over serious charge of first degree murder. >> the family's reaction is himmed. davis' mother is grateful for a conviction and that the truth
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came out. but the family will seek justice for jordan. >> the jury delivers a mixed verdict. deadlock on the first degree murder charge. they rejected his argument that they feared for his life, firing into an s.u.vl filled with teenagers. the verdict came a day before michael jordan would have turned 19. we'll stand and we will continue to wait for justice for jordan. >> but the jury found dunn guilty on three counts of second degree murder and another charge of shooting into an occupied car. each count carrying a 30 year sentence, with a 20 year and tri minimum. >> we are so very hope to have just a little bit of closure.
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it's sad for mr dunn, that he will live the rest of his life in that assistance of torment. and i will pray for him. >> he must be remorseful for the killing of my son. >> the attorney says he'd love to know what the jury was thinking. he refused to speak with reporters. >> the belief has not sunk in, even when he sat next to me, he said, "how is this happening. >> state attorney vowed to retry the murder case. cory is the same prosecutor who tried the george zimmerman gays. cory did not respond if of course aed whether the mistrial was proved, whether she overcharged. something the office was accused of doing. >> i'm proud of our office. >> outside the courthouse protesters said the four days of
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deliberations had them worried about a repeat of acquittal of trayvon martin, killed nine months before jordan davis. relief of a verdict. it was not the right punishment for the they were. >> davis's parents hoped to have a conviction by their son's birthday. it may not be what they were asking for, but they got their wish. michael dunn's attorney praised the jury, deliberating 30 hours. he says with a guilty verdict he has regrets. >> a sentencing date will be set at next month's hearing. protests in venezuela are turning violent. police used tear gas and water cannons. protesters struck back, throwing rocks and starting riots in the street. they are largely led by students. a pro-government rally blamed
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what he called the country's leftist elite, as well as the united states. secretary of state john kerry weighed in saying the actions have a chilling effect: al jazeera's rachel levin has more from caracas. >> singing the national anthem thousands defied the ban on unauthorised protests, taking to the streets in downtown caracas on saturday. >> expressing their growing frustration, president nicolas maduro and what they perceived as a crackdown on the opposition. >> we are tired of the government silencing and discarding us. >> anti-riot police formed a line, trying to stop the protesters from advancing.
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rogs are heard at the police, and then chaos and onfusion. people panicked and scarce, running for cover. >> the situation is continues. the police firing tear gas, dispersing the crowd. they will not go. we can see in the distance that people have rocks. they are coming towards the police. this was just another fourth day in a row of violence in the capital. >> earlier president nicolas maduro held a rally. tens of thousands of his supporters, who wowed to defend him. the fascist want to destroy us. we are the majority, and we'll
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fight for the revolution. calling for peace, they had a message. the hard-line leader of the opposition who organised the marges begins on wednesday. >> translation: the fugitive from justice trembling with fear, you fascist cowered. as both sides continue, refusing to back down, many wonder when calm will return to the streets. >> turning now to the war in syria, where a ceasefire in the city of homs and today. the ceasefire allowed for hundreds of people to be evacued from the war-torn city. it was one of the only achievements of the peace talks in geneva, which are set to enter a third round. stefanie dekker has more from lebanon where many ended up. >> this is winter here. it's incrediblery cold at night.
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it's raining. there's a lot of mud and people coming with clothes that are not guilty right for that. it's freezing with open shoes. a lady said, "give me your shoes, look at what i'm wearing, what my children are wearing." people are incredibly angry. they are frustrated. if you ask them what about geneva, they'll say, "what about it? people are treating us like animals. why are politicians sitting at a table when people are dying?" people are building these. there's a few aid agencies. they are expecting a large influx. i'll show you how a family is living at the moment. they are waiting for a tent over here, and it's basic. people are saying that with the rain a lot of the mattresses that they are given are wet. it doesn't dry, it's not hot enough. there's no sun. certainly a lot of anger here. people say they are being
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treated like animals and nobody cares. >> that's al jazeera's stefanie dekker reporting from near the lebanese-syrian border. >> thousands poured into the streets of bahrain's capital, sparking clashes with the police. earlier an officer died of injuries from a bombing. protests have been heating up since friday, when demonstrators were sprayed with tear gas, while prying to reach the roundabout. the landmark was central to the uprising. they have been rallying for greater political rights. more than 65 were killed since pr tests be -- protests began three years ago. >> this week afghan are marking 25 years since soviet forces with drew from the country. the anniversary became a national holiday. the taliban using the occasion to call on the afghan people to rid the country of u.s. and nato
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troops. in a statement a taliban spokesman said: >> and easing interpretations in ukraine. anti-government protesters left the site of a sit-in, after authorities freed more than 200 of their colleagues. these are pictures of the protesters leaving city hall, and a large rally in kiev is getting under way, where ukraine has seen mass protests when president viktor yanukovych passed on a european union deal, which would have increased trade. italy spent the weekend without a prime minister. less than a near in office. enrico letta resigned on friday after being run out by a party coup. in the next few days center left leader, the mayor of florence is
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expected to be named the new prime minister. he's 39 years old. if sworn in, he'll be italy's youngest prime minister in all of its history. >> new englanders waking up with another layer of fresh snow fall. the storm moved on from rhode island, but the snow is still coming down in maine. another four inches is expected before this most recent storm makes its way to the atlanta. not only did the storm bring snow, it's followed by gusty wind and cold temperatures. >> here to give us the forecast is eboni deon, meteorologist. what do we have to expect today? >> more snow in the maine, but the system is exiting. we are expecting temperatures to really cool down. that's what we are waxing out for today. clearing skies. some chilly temperatures.
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and the winds - they'll be gusty. happening on to your hats if you are going to be in the area. i-95 could be a challenge. winds gusting upwards of 30 miles per hour. you factor that in with the blowing snow. it will be difficult to see out there. visibilities on the low side. winds are gusting around 60 miles per hour. it's a bit of a breezy start to the day. things are quiet for now, but we'll watch the area closely across minnesota, into iowa for another disturbance to move in. it will bring wintry weather. we have not caught a break in the north-west, the moisture is moving onshore. we see a steady flow of rain and snow into the higher elevations. grounds are saturated. we have flood watches, advisories and warnings still up for more rain that is expected. two upwards of four inches, here, once you get into the northern and central areas of
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organ, as well as into western areas of washington. something to be findful of, here is a look at where we stand. a lot of the arrange dots represent rivers at flood stage. we don't have major flooding on the rivers, but we have some that are overrunning the banks. you can see the rivers add up. generally at a flood stage from olympia. it's mainly going to be a snow event. that's why we have the winter storm warnings. this will take place as we get into the evening, overnight into monday. conditions going downhill around minneapolis, and into chicago. >> in egypt former president mohamed morsi is expected to make a third court appearance, where he's on trial for spying, he was kicked out by the military in july, and accused of ipp citing -- inciting murder and using violence against protesters. 10 were killed outside the
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presidential palace in 2012. 20 others are charged. prosecutors say muohamed morsi worked with hamas and hezbollah. two other charges are for escaping gaol and insulting the judiciary. mohamed morsi could face the death penalty. >> the trial of three al jazeera english journalists detained in europe is due to begin on february 20th. they are part of the a group of 20 people charged with or accused of having links to a banned group. mohamed fadel fahmy, mohammed badr, and peter greste have been held for 50 days, accused of having ties to the muslim brotherhood. which egypt declared a terrorist organization. abdullah al-shami, from our al jazeera sister channel has been there since july and is on day 27 of a hunger strike.
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al jazeera denies the charges and conditions to push for their release. >> a break in the storm. >> three months after highan swept across the philippines, we revisit the vulnerable - children. >> big winners in the berlin film festival.
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>> good morning to you. welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live from new york city. korean families divided by war are hoping for a long-awaited reunions. first a look at what temperatures will see across the country with eboni deon, meteorologist. >> it's cold in some places. i want to start with the warm up. typically we have been talking about chilly numbers, and we have them out there. they are across the upper midwest of the let's head southward where we
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are starting our day into the 30s, around birmingham and hampshire. we are headed for a high temperatures of 73 degrees. so it's not just florida getting in on the warmth, it will be around 72. as we head across the south-west, this is an area where we saw record warmth. today we'll approach record warmth in los angeles, 84 degrees in phoenix. we make a run for the record. warm across the south, heading northward as we go through the week ahead. >> thank you so much. at least three people decide as a result of sfarms -- 30 people have decide of storms across the u.k. many cities flooded more than 30,000 homes in england and they are without power. we go to jennifer glasse in cornwall. what is the situation like? >> you join me in port lefon,
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the southern-most port. the community came out this morning. they are cleaning up the port for the first time since 1825. there's no boats. this is a scope repeated up and down the coast line as they are taking advantage of the break in the weather, to clean up what the sea has messed up. the port has a small fishing fleet. last wednesday, when it got really bad here, the boats actually - there's usually more than two dozen boats. they were smashed up. the sea came in, this is where it was protected, and these are two tonne blocks of wood that usually protect the port from the sea. the sea smashed them to bits, and they were swirling in the port itself, and destroyed a lot of the boats, damaged some of the boats, sunk some of them. it's cleaner. the sea swept a lot out. a clean-up under way.
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very much a community effort. >> what exactly are the authorities doing to help the people that lost power or that have been forced from their homes. >> even this morning, where the weather was nice, a couple of homes lost power, and the electric company got thing back on. we haven't seep a lot of emergency services. up and down the cornish coastline, a lot of damage in places they never saw damage. the area of britain is no danger to the sea. they are used to harsh winds and ocean conditions. we are seeing animals washed assure. marine experts are trying to help the dolphins and others battling with the rough seas. a lot of sand dunes have been washed away. everyone who has equipment, farmers are here with tractors, helping out. it's worse in central southern england in somerset. a lot of people are under water. here it's the wind and the sea.
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there the rain, and temperatures are continuing to rise. a serious state of affairs in terms of weather and cleaning up. >> jennifer glasse live from cornwall. thank you for being with us this morning. >> it doesn't stop there. days of torrential reign caused flooding. central parts of the country are underwater. two rivers rose to flood stages, cutting off villages from the outside world. the army has been called in to strengthen the flood defences. >> meanwhile in inton eesh a towns are cleaning up after a volcano erupted. they banned residents that lived within six miles of mt kelud due to safety returns. we are go to java for the story. >> volcanic activity has gone
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down, airports are reopening. all the major airports in java, the most popular island were closed for two days, disrupting travel of millions of passengers. more than 200,000 in east java are affected by the eruption thursday night. authorities are facing a major clean-up operation with thick layers of volcanic nsh covering the cities. >> we are here with 41 soldiers, our troops are trying to clean up the streets. slol cannic -- volcanic ash is bad for health. if affects respiratory systems. >> 70,000 people are staying in evacuation centres. it will be clear in the next few days whether the mountain has calmed down enough for them to go home. >> secretary of state john kerry is in asia. his first stop was south korea, a powerful u.s. ally.
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high on the agenda north korea. the highly secretive country continues to be unpredictable, raising concerns for its neighbours. december 2011, kim jong un becomes the supreme leader after the death of his father. american kenneth bay is arrested, charged with trying to bring down the government, sentenced to 15 years hard labour. >> february 2013, north korean state media reports its third nuclear test in seven years. a joint industrial park is closed by the north as tenses rise with the south. it reopened six months later. >> kim ex-cutes his uncle and there's rising concerns of political instability. a few weeks later on new year's day, kim calls for improving relations. also boasting of his regime. on february 6th, north and south
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korea made tentative agreements to hold reunions for families separated by the war. the last reunions were in 2010. some of the families separated live right here in the united states. >> when the sos escaped the brutalality of the korean war in 1961, they were hope to survive. >> this is my younger brother. >> later they realised they might never see sib lippings they left behind. >> translation: i started crying all the time. i was crazy, running from one room to another, crying, crying. >> mrs. so, who is 83, and mr so who is 91 are hanging on to the chicago home, resisting a move to a nursing home for one reason. >> we did not sell the house. we are waiting for the sib lippings. brothers and sisters from north
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korea, and we wanted to have a house where they could live. >> like the sos, this woman thought she'd be separated from her father for a week or so when the family was sent away weeks ago. she never saw them again. and doesn't know if her brother is alive. >> we have lived with a black hole in our hearts. i have stories to tell. mill jobs of people -- millions of people took their stories with them. >> over the past decade there has been a handful of reunions amongst the divided families. years ago stan field made it her mission to get the men's involved. she lobbied congress, making korean american unions a top priority, it looked like the goal was closer than ever. but then, kim jong-il died.
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and everything stopped. >> we were so close. the hopes crashed again. i was worried. if they don't have hopes, they are gone. >> stan field says to be close and not reach an agreement is devastating. >> the gratitude has been replaced by guilt. >> if we had started earlier, it could have happened by now. i cry, but i cannot sit down. there are enough people there who believe in us. >> the sos try cop sole themselves, poring over old photos. stanfield learnt the reason her father ran marathons was to get publicity in north korea, so word would get out to her family in the south. he was going to run until he
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reunits with his family in south korea. that reunion never happened. now, many korean americans hoped north korea get so desperate for u.s. aid that it will give in, allowing the american reunions. >> i feel like i'm being punished because i left them behind. if i need them again i'll feel like i am reborn. >> but the families are straight too. and time is not on their side. >> korea was a japanese colony before world war ii, and its position was supposed to be temporary. >> north korean president kim jong un threw a birthday party for his late father. officials who attended promised to remain loyal to the kim dynasty. he didn't make a speech. the birthday of his father kim jong-il is known as "the day of
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the shining star." syria's refugee crisis gets worse, causing a country to question his own policy. one man's trash becomes another man's treasure. i'm mark morgan, coming up, american skiers go for gold in sochi, finishes for college basketball's elite.
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>> good morning to you. welcome back. i'm morgan radford. here are the top stories. michael dunn facing life behind bars, a white man accused of killing an unarmed black teen. a jury found michael dunn guilty of three counts of attempted murder, but are divided over the serious charge of first degree
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murder. clashes between anti-government protesters and riot police are occurring in venezuela, where more than 1,000 people have taken to the streets. a ceasefire in homs. the governor asking for an extension to ask hundreds of residents to get out of harm's way. >> a small found in sweden has become a safe haven for refugees. it's all because of the country's open door emigration policy. that policy is now being questioned. >> mohammed was on the verge of adult life in damascus. with a degree in engineering, he was poised to start a new job. he feared he would be arrested like his cousin, after going to an opposition demonstration. mohammed fled. he has an internship of his company, and takes classes in the evening. we have to start interest
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scratch again. to learn new language, adopt new society, new country and laws. >> mohammed is one of thousands of syrians who fled to syria. the country has a long history of accepting immigrants, an open-arms policy. many end up south of stockholm. on 90,000 citizens, 30,000 are immigrants, putting strains on local services. >> we don't have enough housing. that's the big problem. for of the refugees. they stay with relatives. >> the bell rings for successful deal at a call center. the european union founded project provides training and jobs for immigrants. down the hall there's a class for gardeners with lessons on how to keep accounts and pay taxes. >> schools have had to hire extra counsellors to cope with a growing number of children traumatised by war, or a hellish
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journey to escape it. of the 800 students of the romma school, 99% have an immigrant background. it is schools like that that fuel support for the swedic democratic party. they hold 20 of parliament's 349 seats. and they are unabashedly anti-immigrant. we want to lower immigration to sweden with 90%. so that is a big change. people coming from syria. they get permanent residency automatically which is irresponsible. >> support for restrictions on immigration is growing. the swedish democratic party wants to stop the open arms policy. more and more people are joining them, and they hope to increase their share of the vote in the elections coming up in the autumn. >> about 15% of swede ep's population is foreign born,
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which is the highest rate in that part of the europe. >> sunday marks 100 days since typhoon haiyan slammed into the philippines, damaging 1.1 million homes. we talk to the most vulnerable survivors. >> in ring has become a source of comfort for 14-year-old haiyan survivor. it's all he has left of his mother. >> he lost both his parents and his sib lippings during the typhoon. >> translation: i pray that they are happy, and are watching over me. >> he is grateful he found relatives to take him in. three months after haiyan, and many children are living in evacuation center. six million have been affected
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by the storm. humanitarian groups classified 500,000 as highly vulnerable. >> they have no guardians or come from severely affected areas where capacity for recovery is poorest. officials fear such children face a danger of not just being exploited, but abandoned by caregivers looking for jobs elsewhere. >> these children might somehow become a liability to the community. >> a reality that ironically 14-year-old christina escaped thanks to haiyan. she and four of her siblings live in a government care facility after social workers found them after the storm. their parents abandoned them years before. >> i am happier now because there is someone taking care of my sib lippings. they are getting an education
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now. so far a small number of these vulnerable survivors have been helped. there's much to be done. the rain no longer frightens this boy. he is hopeful about the future. he feels his family is with him and he says he just might be happy again. >> all in all the united nations says about 11 million people were affected by typhoon haiyan. a group of people helped to fight sepp soreship. they asked them to help tear down the great firewall. they asked him to find out whether american companies helped the chinese government to set up internet controls in the first place. protecting europe from foreign spies. the chancellor is pushing for a
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regional data. spying is a huge concern for europe. this after reports last year that the n.s.a. carried out mass surveillance. the cell phone was tapped. the use of electronics may travel further than you think. they are doing so at risk to their own workforce. they have more from karachi on the dangers of recycling waste. >> hundreds of thousands of the waste is imported from the middle east. a small percentage is useable, the rest is recycled locally. local businessmen try to salvage what they can, and don't let most of the imports go to waste. picture tubes are taken out. then given a thorough polish.
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then put into empty tv cases which are imported separately. like that, one man's garbage is another man's tv. >> with impost from china to make the tvs, we have been doing it for the last six years. 19 employees made 116 a day. >> under the scrap dealer they pick up the shells. the process is hazardous. experts believe improper dislofl releases cadd myium, mercury and chromium. >> working for just $3 a day some are oblivious to the damages the fuels can cause to their health. some of them do it just to earn a living. >> we found school-going children that worked 12 hours a day to make ends meet. >> translation: i didn't want to
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go to school at first, so i started working here. i have eight brothers and sisters. now i go to the school some mornings, and come to work here. these scrap dealers are on open secret. surely their disregard of the environment has to be breaking laws. but it isn't. despite the dangers. there's no law on the books that deals with e-waste. >> i can't find it. the law and environment minister admitted the government's failures. the environmental laws that we made include detail, but electronic waste is not considered as detailed. this is an concession i made. the data has no impact on the lives of the workers. we continue to try to earn a living from what the world regard said as waste.
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>> in the u.s., 112,000 laptop and desktop computers are discarded. >> some in russia hope to turn the spotlight on the olympic games. in moscow dozens of demonstrators described a rally against oppressive and homophobic laws. vladimir putin let his frustrations be known. >> is there hope that you won't tie sports with politics, is there. >> putin was responding to a question about anti-government protesters. right here at home, the sochi olympics are front and the center as the american men mitt the slopes. >> a lot talking about the u.s. hockey team. we start with skiing, and after disappointing finishes in the downhill and supercombined offense, bode miller hoped to make amends, competing in his
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fifth winter games. miller completed his run early, watching the field. his performance good enough for the bronze. andrew widebreak took the silver. wib rick won the bronze in the super-g four years ago. at age 36, bode miller is the oldest skier to medal. this is his sixth olympic medal. let's take a look at the updated medal count. russia tied for the lead. the usa found four cold, four silver. norway, canada and the netherlands had 14 medals. the usa men's hockey team has little to celebrate. the americans will be back on the ice facing slovenia in the final round. it was an emotional win over the russians yesterday. after a controversial disallowed
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goal, this one went to an 8-round shoot-out with tj oshie of the u.s. taking six shots in the shoot-out, and he scored on four, including the game winner. the americans improved to 2 and 0 in group play. >> it's something you dream about going into shoot outs and imagining as a kid. it feels great. getting the winter night was big. it doesn't mean much without the win. we have a job to win. >> to kansas, march madness a few weeks away. the important number one seeds up for grabs. compelling games around the country. we begin with syracuse, the orange making a habit of surviving the close ones. a case in point last evening. trevor couldn'ty going the other -- cooney going the other way.
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tyler innis with a floater and one, still a tie game. nine points. syracuse shooting 35% from the field. late in the came syracuse with the turn over. cj fare for the lay-up. syracuse taking the lead by one. farewith 11. under 7 seconds. tyler innis just inside the 3-point line, off the win. syracuse unbeaten winning 56-55. the orange 25 and 0. florida has been to the lead eight three straight times under billy donovan. the gaiters four seniors, they'll be a tough out. a win for florida facing kentucky. scotty willberken with a career high 25 points. patrick young. he had two huge 3-point plays during a crucial spurt by florida. less than five to play, gaiter
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kick it out to michael frasier the second for three. florida beats kentucky. 17 straight wins for the gaiters. florida 23 and 2. >> parker and duke taking on maryland. it was the last scheduled game. jake layman missing. kid at home, block out on the rebound. second half tide at 64. des-wells step back three - nice. wells with 17. maryland on top now. later, duke within one, parker driving through traffic. he's good. blue devil is up by one, parker with a game-high 23. now we move to the final second. a close one. last chance for maryland. charles mitchell down low with the hook, bouncing around and comes off. how did the ball not go down, but it didn't.
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duke escapes 69-67. that is a look at sports. >> app outbreak of measles in kenya forcing sick children in a refugee camp. >> this mother greaves for her son. he had been sickly as an infant. when he had measles it weak ebbed his immune system -- weakened his im un system he could not fight a measles attack. >> he was my only son, i have no husband and i thought he would be the one to get us out of here. he's gone. >> at the rev get champ in northern kenya sick children have to be quarantined inside. in a camp hospital the outbreak of measles have been worsened. fleeing from the conflict back home. >> when you deal with a
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situation where you have many coming into a camp, one of the biggest public health concerns is a measles outbreak. the important thing is that we are identifying the myselfle cases and responding to that. >> 2-year-old twins were admitted two weeks ago. the mother noticed the symptoms. >> they got fevererish. i started getting red. they got a rash. they were weak. >> so now every child under 15 years in the camp is targeted in an emergency vaccination that began on wednesday. 50,000 children in all. it's an exercise that will extend beyond the boundaries of the camp to the kenyan community and right to the boarder with south sudan, where the refugees are coming from. >> the refugees have been medically screened and
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vaccinated. they are not clear yet. they have to be screened for a second time when they get to the camp, monitored and sack sinated. con -- vaccinated again. >> containing the spread is a number one priority. humanitarians admit it's an uphill task. >> about it 122,000 people die from measles in 2012. most of them under the age of five. >> powered by the sun - we'll tell you which californian city is trying to remove itself from the local power grid. a series of storms pound the north-west. i'll let you know how much more rain we can expect to add to the flooding in the region.
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. first, a live look at massachusetts, where a storm moved out of the area, leaving us this beautiful sunrise. some parts of the area received about 11 inches of snow, and that was overnight. >> good morning to you. i'm morgan radford live from new york city. a californian city on the way from being powered by the sun. first a look at the snow and rain, where it may fall across the country with meteorologist eboni deon. >> we are still getting the rain in the north-west. that's the way the pattern has ban as of late. a steady flow of moisture off the pacific. lots of rain has fallen. all the way down to northern california. the pattern shifted north a bit. we still have scattered showered activity, adding 2 upwards to 4
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inches of rain fall in western areas of oregon. many rivers at flood stage. some are going to overflow the banks. we'll watch the low-lying areas closely, as we head to the south-west. income, here we have been dealing with heat. we are watching a departing storm system. it's hugging the north-eastern areas of main. we could puck up four inches. localized inches, eight inches of snowfall, watching it closely. across the mid-atlantic we are not expecting a lot. >> all right, thank you so much. 60 miles north-east of los angeles, a ground-breaking green movement is urned way -- underway. with 300 days of sunshine, lang caster california is one of the first to mandate solar panels. stephanie stanton has more than the small community gaining big
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national attention. >> i want to wait for the reviews. >> lancaster mayor is a man on a mission. to empower the resident and alternative energy. he drives a tessler. it was the first person in lang caster to employ solar panels. >> this month by electric bill will be about three hours. it's huge. under the leadership it began to cause solar panels. it's generating its own electricity. >> we are leading the world in this. we'll be the first city in the world. all the buildings, 90% of electricity comes from solar. panels like these have been installed at lancaster's 25 schools, in an effort to reach the energy goals. that means producing as much
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electricity as it onassumes. lan castier generates 1.5 in electricity. paris's mission has gone beyond that, it became the first city in the nation to make residential solar panels mandatory, denying permits to builders. it was interesting that the building industry is - they came and spoke against it for three minutes, and came out saying "we agree with you." one of the nation's largest home builders have made solar panels a standard feature. >> this is the meter. >> resident kerry louis and her husband brought the solar panels. our bill from edson will be $1.50. the rates have risen 16% over the past three years. mayor paris said they haven't embraced the solar movement. they are supposed to act like
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they are in favour of solar energy. utility says it's a leading purchaser of renewable energy with 20% of its portfolio coming from sources. the mayor is not taking chapses. it will go a step further, producing and selling the solar power. >> i see a day we will not be connected to the bridge. a moment where the sun will set on his city and arrived the country. stephanie stanton, al jazeera. >> many home owners and businesses report that solar panels cut the bills between 50 and 90%. >> officials in new mexico are investigating a radiation leak at an underground site in south-eastern new mexico whether the federal government seals low-grade nuclear waste. workers have not tested positive
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and the u.s. department of arge says there's no danger to people or the environment. the cause of the leak is not known. >> a chibees thriller, black coal, thin ice takes the aware at the berlin film festival. >> "black hole, thin ice" >> a dream come true. the director's take on winning the top gong in berlin. this love fest, a long way from the violence of the murder mist rit "black coal, thin ice." it follows an overweight detective on the trail of a serial killer. the leading man put on 20 kilograms for the role, a performance that secured him best actor. it's been a big festival for asian fans. a japanese actress nabbing gong
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for her role. a true story of a 14-year-old girl's abduction and rape and murder trial after she kills the man who kidnapped her. >> i can't tell you how much i'm happy and proud of the director and proud of the team >> the silver bear for best director. >> while the film "boyhood" did not take the top aware. american richard linklater got the nod for best director. he used the same actors over a 12 year period, filming for a few days every year. there has been more than 400 screenings over the past 11 days, kicking off the film festival circuit. the line up has criticism. the berlin festival is known for anti-hollywood outlook. some said this year it focus the too much on films from the u.s.
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wes ander don's "grand buddha pest hotel" won the grand jury prize and screened opening night. >> every scene has another favourite face. it has a film that didn't need a nuance to get the audience. there'll be more of the silver screen on show. >> and the end of hour first hour, here is what we are following. a guilty verdict in the trial of michael dunn. jurors deadlocked over a murder charge but convicted him of attempted murder of three others. >> venezuela jns angry at the crime and rising prices. >> winter's chill is felt in many areas of the country. in the south-west the heat is
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on. i'll have the details on where else temperatures will climb. >> i'm morgan radford, back with you in 2.5 minutes when al jazeera returns.
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[ chants ] >> outrage over another stand your ground case and why many are comparing it to the trayvon martin trial. >> police say they admitted though murdering a man. the shocking confession after that has police looking for bodies. >> whose child? whose husband?
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whose brother will be next. >> detectives say he overdosed on drugs. his family say he was murdered for being black. a mysterious death in a community of rachial violence. a teeny tiny insect posing a major threat to lives and stock. why scientists are takin takinge skies to fight flies. chap chapt >> a mistrial op murder one. welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live from new york city. protesters marched through the night, calling for the
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resignation of the lead prosecutor in the trial of michael dunn, the white man found convicted on three counts of teamed murder. jurors were deadlocked over serious charms, first degree murder. demonstrators were not happy. >> the fight has begun. we are not going to sit down. >> we stood out here and were hoping for a little better outcome for jordan and his family. we believe in our loss. we support them. when they don't work, it's time for a change. that's hopefully what we can do. >> now, the jury's verdict may put michael dunn in prison, the racially charmed case puts florida's stand your ground law
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in the spotlight. >> the jury delivered a mixed verdict. deadlocked on the first degree murder charge. they rejected his argument that he feared for his life when he fired into an s.u.vl filled with teenagers, playing loud music. the verdict came a day before jordan davis would have turned 19. >> we'll continue to stopped and we will continue to wait for justice for jordan. >> the jury found dunn guilty on three counts of attempted second degree murder and another charge of shooting into an occupied car. each count carrying with it a 30 year sentence and a mandatory minimum. we are happy to have a little bit of closure. it's - it's sad for mr dunn,
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that he will live the rest of his life in that sense of torment. and i will pray for him. >> he must be remorseful for the killing of my son. >> the defense attorney said he would love to know what the jury was thinking. they refused to speak to the jurors. >> he is in disbelief. when he sat next to me he said, "how is it happening?" state attorney vowed to retry the first degree murder case. cory is the same prosecutor who tried the george zimmerman case. she did not respond when she was asked that the mistrial proved that she overcharged in this case, something her office was accused of doing in the george zimmerman case. >> i'm proud of our office. >> outside the courthouse, protesters we spoke to said the four days of deliberations had
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them worried about a repeat of george zimmerman's acquittal. killed nine months before davis. relief of a verdict and punishment, but it was not the right punishment for the person. all along they hoped to have a conviction. it may not have been what they hoped for. they got their wish. >> that was a report from jacksonville florida. >> al jazeera legal contributor jamie floyd joins us. the jury is deadlocked on first degree murder. what does that mean they are not sure of? >> the jury is no longer deadlocked, the trial has been declared. we'll have another trial, angela cory and jonathan guy insisted the case will be tried again. it means a jury could not agree this was a murder, that jordan davis was murdered by michael
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done. they could not agree on the top charge that it was an intentional killing by the defendant of the boy. the three counts of attempted murder stuck. what is the difference between the charges? >> it's hard to understand. it seems inconsistent, right. four boys are in the car, the same pattern applied to the four boys. it's not like a bar fight where you could have a murder of one young man and different patterns. they are all in the same car, the shots are fired - nine at the car, one miss, so 10 rounds fired. he is convicted on attempted murder, intent to kill the other boys, but they can't agree on the top charge. why is that? someone, someone in the jury room apparently believed that he was afraid that jordan davis was reaching for a weapon. no weapon was recovered. which that raises a big question about stand your ground laws. help us understand what that
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means. it means that any person who feels they are in danger has the right to quell the danger, whether it's real. is that legalizing a vigilante system. there's a lot of confusion. i believe, and i want to be clear that stand your ground has created a culture of vigilanteism. it's highlighted in florida. one, that's the first state that passed stand your ground. it's a van guard state. >> it's effectively ground zero. >> we had high profile cases george zimmerman, and the movie theatre case, the popcorn, the dad shot for texting and that's not a race case, both people are white in that case. however, stopped your ground is a procedural matter more than anything else. you have to assert it as trial, front and center at the beginning of the case. the judge decides whether or not the case goes away.
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it ineffects every aspect of the trial because you can race it again during the course of the case. it can be given as a jury instruction. it does say, as you suggest, to everyone in florida, that you have no duties to retreat. if you are afraid and carry your gun, you can shoot first, and ask questions later. that's what is happening in the stand your ground cases. given the law is, in fact, on the books, does that tie the hands. it may have tied the hands much one juror. some wanted to convict. we didn't get an acquittal. they didn't convict on a lesser charge. they couldn't decide. it was suggested that one juror felt he had a right to shoot and not ask questions, shoot first, ask questions later. >> after the verdict a number of protesters marched to angela cory's office asking her to
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resign. let's listen to that. >> we want angela cory out of office: >> right, some of those protesters are angry because they say it was a mistake not to bring race into the trial. they said that that really was a factor, and she didn't acknowledge it. you mentioned that earlier, was that legally a mistake. >> these things are diff. it's difficult to determine whether it will be better to put race front and center in the court room. the defendant could have done the same thing and said "i was more afraid. it would have been an incendiary event. he could say it was reasonable for me to be afraid because he was black, but i was afraid and i had a right to stand my ground. the issue with cory is less of a concern than the issue of stand your ground. there were feelings that she didn't act quickly enough in the george zimmerman case, they didn't rest him quickly enough.
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that can't be said in this case. >> it can't be said. >> no, michael dunn was arrested immediately, prosecute precip to usually, quickly, and i think fully. they'll go back after him. i don't think that the dunn and the george zimmerman case have as many parallels as people think. there was no rolling on the ground or a quep that this man -- question that this man was an imminent threat of death. the boy was not close to on top of him. the kid is sitting in a car, shot to death by a man that could have driven away. >> thank you for joining us. >> a gaol house confession from a serial killer, a pennsylvania woman charged with murdering a man she met on craigs list said she killed before. she made the claim in a newspaper interview from behind bars, admitting to luring a man
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to his death in november after meeting him online. barbara claims she's behind a cross-country murder spree in which more than 20 have died. she said: bsh >> she said she's ready to speak to police saying: >> police are investigating the claims. >> more damaging leaks from ex-n.s.a. contractor edward snowden. the national surveillance agency eavesdropped on an american law firm, hired by the indonesian government to assist with trade talks. the n.s.a. used australian counterpart to monitor communications because it was restricted from doing so directly. >> hackers have broken into the fundraising website kick starter, and stolen user data. kick starter didn't say how many accounts were compromised.
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credit card numbers were not tape. >> the company encourages all users to change their pass wards. >> winter weather is finally moving out of the north-east. if you can believe it, another round of snow may be behind it. meteorologist eboni deon is here with your forecast. >> we are getting rid of one system. we have another one moving through the midwest, and we are expecting light amounts. now the focal point here where we have the system finally crapping up and moving out to sea. still in line to possibly see upwards to four inches of snow. we are clearing out in most locations. main we are dealing with it. aside from the snow we have the wind, and that has been strong at times. we are going to continue to see winds gusting, 30 miles or greater. it's definitely a day to be extra careful on the roadways.
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we have the snow around. of course, just travelling, if you are going perpendicular to some winds, it will be difficult. now winds are gusting up to 30 in albany, we could see the winds gusting upwards of 40 miles per hour, off the coastline. be careful for that. across the midwest, it's quiet. we'll watch another disturbance. that will bring the snow back to that area. rain and snow, it hasn't stopped. our moisture feed continuing off the pacific. rain activity keeping the rivers fall. we have flood warnings in a number of areas across washington or idaho. >> at least three people died as a result of storms all across the u.k. many cities flooded and more than 30,000 homes in england are without power. jennifer glasse is in cornwell in the south-east part of the country. we are looking behind you.
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it looks devastated. what is the situation like. >> this is port levin, this is the southern port. the people are taking advantage of the sun. this is the clean-up effort. the village came out. normally this would be full of water. you can see along here, along the wall. there's lines, what happened on wednesday, the ocean came in here. it sank 10 votes, damaged others and pulled everything oust of the harbour. they are doing this and recorded it all up and down the coast of cornwall. the oceans and winds where the damage blew off windows and roof tiles and damaged the boat. the hard seas have been difficult. you know, they know that they are lucky, they haven't had the flooding that they have seen dawn in the thames valley, where
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thousands of homes flooded. they don't have the opportunity to clean up like this. they are waiting for the water to go down. it's been aive week. with floods, winds, seas here in cornwall. they are picking up today, but it will take a few weeks before the port reopens, and we don't know if the port will cooperate. >> how are the flood victims coping where you are. are they able to get back to their homes, is the trusty turned on, what is going on now. >> cornwall on the coast. you have - a lot of these houses are high up. flooding has not been an issue, except when the ocean comes in. down in the thames valley, in the somerset valley where a lot of homes flooded. i was in the homes this week and last week, and their waterlogged. there's nowhere for the water to go. the thames barrier is being used to try to drape the thames
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river. it's waterlogged. we had a lot of harsh weather, rain storms and high winds. it will be several weeks, if not months before people can get back in their homes. when there's a break in weather. we can see people go in and get what they get out. obviously you have to be careful. there's water and electricity. a lot of homes are without power. a dangerous situation. trees coming down over the weekend. it was killed, bringing down power lines. it will be a long recovery and expensive. >> thank you jennifer glasse reporting from cornwall. >> days of torrential rain causing flooding in croatia. at least two rivers have ris ebb to staples not seep in 50 years. roads have been closed, cutting off villages from the outside world. the croatian army called in to
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distribute sandbags. an area of texas has become infamous for hate crimes. the death of a black man reignited racial tensions. the detectives say he overdosed. his family say he was murdered. >> 25% of investment comes from the u.s. >> the u.k. struggling through a recession on par with a financial slowdown in the u.s. economic signs of life in london that may have the brits saying thank you america. >> if you want to prevent a stroke, you may want to drink more orange juice, results of a study after this short break.
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>> most of east and central china choked by a thick layer of smag. several semis under a yellow alert. it's the third day in a row that haze reduced visibility. in some areas people couldn't see more than a third of a mile. it was slower than usual, traffic managed to flow at a
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seminormal pace. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. it's mysterious death of a blackman sparking interpretations in texas. first let's look at the forecast of the >> we are going to see close-up picture. there is good news as far as the temperature side goes. i want to take you into chicago. it may be in the mid-20s. we are going to deal with the storm system moving in. once we get beyond that. temperatures - into new york city, storms moving out of the midwest, we'll keep it on the cold side for the start of the work week. temperatures will rise slightly above average. we'll approach the 50 degree
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mark. >> thank you so much. the death of a young african man in a small texas town is getting attention from the department. 25-year-old alfred wright believes he was murdered. the case cas inflamed racial tensions in the town, a protest organised by the black panthers drew 200 people. we have a report on what happened the night of wright's death. some of the images may be graphic. >> it was a cold night last november. alfred wright disappeared at the rest of these woods. the physical therapist was on his way to see the last location of the day. when his truck broke down at the store. right called his wife when she called him back, she knew something was wrong. he was breathing heavily.
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>> i was acting him things like "are you working on your truck? are you mad, are you running?" i never got a response. >> she never heard from him again. that night his family discovered his abandoned truck and called the sab een county sheriff for help. the sheriff called off the search after four days. family and friends combed through the woods. on day 18 a terrible discovery. as the last twist the body landed straight, straight like this. this is the air landing in the ditch. >> i walked up on him, it seemed like his spirit spoke loudly into my spirit and said, "daddy, i knew you would find me." his face looks mutilated. the space was skeleton, and eyes were gone, ears was missing.
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the official autopsy noted his tuping was missing and the facial damn was due to animals, and that lethal doses of methamphetamine and cocaine were in the body. the conclusion, accidental death by drug overdose. it was mind blowing to see everything in the toxicology report. wright's family hired a frontsic pathologist to do another autopsy. she said her suspicion was homicide. >> someone murdered him and threw him there. >> we need justice right now. many blacks in the area share the suspicion and took to the streets in protest, poimenting to -- pointing to a history of racial violence. the dragging death of james bird in 1998 in jasper, a cross burning, and the 1990 conviction of three white police officers in the murder of a black sab een
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county prisoner. we wanted to hear from sheriff maddic himself. i left messages, emails and have not heard back from the sheriff. when can i have a chance to ask the questions that the community has? >> i will have him give you a call. the department of justice is investigating right's desk. >> whose chilt, whose husband. whose brother. whose brother will be next. >> their fear is real as they wait for their questions about what happened to alfred right to be aped. >> officials say the justice department is monitoring the investigation. the fbi remains on standby to help the textous rangers. across the atlantic signs that one of the great economic centres is in recovery.
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that's with major ties to the u.s. london's comeback will be welcome news for wall street, phil itner shows us why. >> when san franciscan lauren sherwin looked for a place in europe, she decided a move from silicon valley to the silicon valley roundabout was the april. the roundabout earned the nickname because a lot of international tech firms are moving in, especially from the u.s. london is booming. recovering from years of recession. mayor boris johnson says his city is pulling all of brit april with it, meaning good news from the u.s. a u.k. report says the two countries do about $200 billion worth of trade and have a trillion invested in each other. >> jeffreys brieing in shaw the head of a business association says american ties are a major part of the comeback. european business is an important part of the recovery
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story, if you look at the numbers on u.s. investment in the country, historically, actually on any basis, in any year, u.s. investors are the most significant in the country. 25% of all investment comes from the u.s. every year it's the leading source of investment. >> there's a major free trade deal in negotiations between the u.s. and the e.u. which could be worth billions more revenue, it could be in jeopardy if the uk votes to leave the european union. >> if you make a long-term investment and rely on access to the european market for the products, you will think twice about coming to a country which may not probably but possibly may about not be in the european union in five for 10 years. for online businesses, that is not so much an issue, and she urges her colleagues to come
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over. >> for me i sort of started with friends that i have been working with starters. when they ask how did the launch go, i basically said "you need to come here immediately." >> with the economic powerhouse that is loipd, there's little -- london, there's little doubt that they'll continue a rob unfortunate exchange. >> the u.s. has a history of pulling together in times of hardship. in this crisis, it's as true as ever. >> brit april's office for national statistics said the u.k.'s economy grew 1.9% in 2013, the strongest rate since 2007. >> another reason to drink orange juice. researchers in france found low levels of vitamin cn body could trigger a certain type of stroke. it's with people at low levels could be at greater risks for bleeding in the brage. it's called -- in the brain.
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it's called haemorrhage and stroke and is rare and dead gli. >> thousands are making their way to taipei zoo to catch a glimpse of a panda club. more than 68,000 visited the zoo on february the 2nd, the highest number in any single day. the attraction is expected to generate 16 million usd for the city alone. >> an apology for the lead negotiator in peace talks, why round two of the negotiations failed and what happened to the innocent civilians while we wait for round three. the taliban calling for the removal of troops from afghanistan. why president obama is changing his strategy. and an explosive night on the street of turkey, how a man behind bars is sparking the clashes with police.
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>> a second round of syrian peace talks wrapped up with little to show for it. opposition leaders and government officials agreed to return to geneva for a third round. no date has been set. millions of syrian refugees continue to struggle just to survive. stefanie dekker went to see what conditions were like in one lebanese town along the syrian boarder. this is how some people live her, it's winter here, and it gets incredibly cold. it's raining. there's a lot of mud, a lot of people came with clothes not right for that. they are freezing with open shoes. a lady came and said "give me your shoes, look what i'm wearing, look what my children are wearing", look at the camp, people are angry. they are frustrated. if you ask them "what about
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geneva?", they say "what about it? people are treating us like animals, they don't care. why are politicians sitting at a table when people are dying." there are a few aid agencies, there's larger influxes expected. tents are built. we'll look at how one family is living. they are waiting for a tent. it's basic of the people are saying that even with the rain a lot of the mattresses they are given get wet. it doesn't dry because it's not hot enough, there's no sun. a lot of anger here. people say they are treated like animals and nobody cares. >> al jazeera's stefanie dekker reporting from near the lebanese-syrian border. >> one things the talks achieved is the evacuation of homs. hundred left the war-torn village during six days of a ceasefire. with have this report across the
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border in lib none where many -- lebanon where many refugees fled. >> this could be anywhere. a local football match in a dusty playground. this is a shelter in homs. a syrian city clinging to a fragile cease fire. until a few days ago these people lived in the old city under siege. >> suns the new incidents started we used the fireplace to cook. we never went out of the house, we never knew what was going on out there. us women were not able to go out. >> i lost my husband two years ago. i heard no news from him. we were together and we went out. from that moment i have not heard from him at all. >> the u.n. brokered humanitarian ceasefire allowed them and 14 others to leave. the governor wants the ceasefire extended as mar people try to get out, including hundreds of
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young men. there were real concerns for their safety. >> yesterday 70 young men left the camp to go back to their homeland. they can live where they wish. according to the instructions of the president and his sponsorship and the government's plan, we are working on settling things for all the young man here, and those not involved in the bloodshed. >> if they manage to leave, they, too, will become displaced. many made it into neighbouring lebanon. there the residents are setting up lives as refugees. from homs, a city more than 2,000 years old, to a new home, this one a tent city. >> those who escaped ohms are not necessarily -- homs are not necessarily out of harm's way. many of the men are held for questioning by government officials, and fear they may be
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imprisoned, tortured or mixed >> afghans are marking 25 years sips soviet forces withdrew from their country. the taliban is using the occasion to call on the afghan people to rid the country of u.s. and nato troops. in a statement a taliban spokesman stated: the obama administration changes its exit strategy, and the white house is waiting until hamid karzai leaves office. joining us now to discuss u.s. foreign policy is douglas oliphant, a senior security fellow at the new american noungs and joins us from -- foundation, and joins us from washington d.c. the big questioning is whether
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the americans meet the same fate as those that pulled out of afghanistan this weekend. >> no, the united states is not rawing in the same manner because our county is not coppalsing -- alappsing as the -- collapsing as the soviet union did. >> u.s. officials were frustrated with the afghan government after the release of 60 prisoners last week. in turn hamid karzai expressed frustration with the u.s. let's lisp to what he said -- listen to what he said. >> afghanistan is a sovereign country. if the afghan authorities release a prisoner, it is of no cop certain to the us and should be of no concern to the use. >> is there anything wrong with saying afghanistan is, in fact,
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a sovereign country? >> we have a conflict of interest. he's right that afghanistan is a sovereign country. the legitimate leadership in afghanistan can do what it wants. we have tens of thousands of troops, and we are concerned that they are extremist taliban and leaders organised to fight and kill the soldiers that roim. the u.s. shift d strategy and is waiting for karzai to leave office then to push for the signing of the agreement. is it a mistake to put things at stake in the ballot box. >> it's not so much a ballot box the the closer you get to 2014, more confused and befuddled that might have to be. leaving the hotel room
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>> do you expect that hamid karzai will fade away is this. >> it's hard to see what he thinks his role is. he may be a president emertize, where he has a portfolio, or he may go into exile. it's not clear what we'll see. what about abdullah abdullah does the united states want him to win? >> it's important that the white house doesn't support a candidate. there's several. hamid karzai's little brother, abdullah, abdul a, a lot of legitimate candidate. i don't think anyone knows who is ahead in the pollingment polling is primitive in
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afghanistan. >> thank you for being with us. >> thank you. >> demonstrators clash with police in turkish cities. >> protesters throwing stones at riot police, where they respond by firing tear gas and water canons. the clashes mark the 15th anniversary of a kurdish leader. protesters in ukraine left the site of a 2-month sit-in after authorities freed more than 200 of their authorities. these are pictures of protesters leaving city hall where they were camped out. a large rally in kiev was under way. ukraine saw mass protests when viktor yanukovych passed on a european union deal that would have increased trade, opening the country's borders. >> in venezuela there's protests, turning violent, where police used tear gas and water
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canons against demonstrators. they struck back, throwing rocks and fires where opposition rallies are led by students. a pro-government rally, nicolas maduro blamed the leftist elite and the united states. secretary of state john kerry expressed his concerns saying: >> rachel lef jip has more from caracas. >> sing the national anthem thousand defied a ban and took to the streets on saturday. expressing frustration, nicolas maduro, and what they prove is a
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crackdown on the opposition. >> we are tired of the government silencing and discarding us. >> antiriot police formed a line, stopping the protesters vansing. rocks are held at the police and then chaos and confusion. >> people pan ibed and scared, run for cover. the situation is tense, the police took tear gas, dispersing the crowd. they will not go. we can see in the distance that people have rocks, they are coming towards the police. this is just the fourth day in a row of violence in the capital.
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>> earlier the president heard a rally. tens of thousands of supporters vowed to defend him. >> the fascists want to destroy u we are the majority, and we'll fight for revolution. >> calling for peace, the government had a message for the hard-line leader of the opposition, who organised the student march which began on wednesday. the fugitive of justice. hand yourself in, you fascist cow. >> as both sides sustained. refusing to back down, many wondered when calm would return to the streets. >> protesters in venezuela are angry about high inflation and the crime and the lack of basic goods. now to a disease that is swacting humans and animals, caused by a fly. there's no vaccine against it.
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nick hack sells us how the united nations is tackling it in an u.n. conventional way. >> this is the latest effort to comeback a disease. victims once contracting it die a slow death. it mostly affects livestock, but humans can suffer from it too trans-tans if the stock is -- >> translation: if the stock is sick, we cannot make money. >> all attempts to get rid of the disease failed, until now. health officials believe the solution is in the box. inside are blood-sucking flies responsible for spreading the disease. these plies are different, bred in veepa at the international a -- vienna, at the international atomic agency. >> i6789d thee insects will not
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be able to mate -- these insects will not be able to make. this is a multi-million dollar operation. every 20 seconds a box of flies is dropped. at this pace it's believed it will be wiped out by 2016. >> this feels like a military operation. here is a catch. scientists don't know what the eradication of the toot si fly will do to the echo system. >> we know what they do on the animals, our cattle. we know little on what is happening to the eco system. what is the role and function of the flies on the wildlife. do they have a control. >> u.n. officials believe the
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benefits outweigh the risks saying farmers will have healthier life stock if the disease is erat kated. the plan it to expand the project across the continent, an area twice the size of the united states, home to a rich, unique and fragile eco system. >> some 36 african countries are infested by tutsi flies. >> subhuman life forms by the dozen. the zombie march. no u.s. hockey team won gold without a player from one small village in minnesota. why skaters seem to have the mid as touch. and the amazing game that is keeping legends alive. we'll show you one of the college basketball's finishes
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and a scare for the top team.
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>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. next - the minnesota town with the mid as touch when it comes to olympic hockey. first, a look at the forecast with meteorologist eboni deon. >> we have been watching the snow. it put the caboche on weekend plans, outdoors wise for some areas of the north-east. this system is exiting, bringing snow into extreme north-east areas of main. that's where we could see snow around cara bu, to press kil main, and it's windy. aside from the snow, that part is winding down, we'll have to watch out for the whipped. we'll watch the next disturbance through the area, as we get into
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this evening, into monday. that will really kind of make conditions go downhill around minneapolis, and chicago. we are not expecting widespread heavy snow, yirp from 2-5-6 inches of snow. >> speaking of wicked weather, clean up after a volcano you' you're -- erupted. those living 600 miles from mt kelud have been banned from returning due to safety return. >> volcanic activity of mt kelud has gone down. airports are reopening. major airports into the island of java were closed for two days, disrupting travel of millions of passengers. more than 2-00,000 people in east java are affected by the eruption of mt kelud on thursday
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night. authorities are facing a clean-up. >> we are here with 41 soldiers, as you can see the troops are cleaning up the public streets. not only is vol cannic ash bod for a person's health, it affects the respiratory system and caused accidents. >> more than 70,000 people are staying in evacuation centres. it will become clear if the mountain calmed down enough for them to go home. >> that was al jazeera, correspond. >> college basketball's top-ranked team is giving fans this. mark morgan is here to give the latest. >> a lot of white-knuckled fans, gripping the shares. march madness is a few weeks away. the number one seeds up for grabs, compelling games around the country. we'll begin with syracuse, the orange, as we said, making a habit of surviving the close
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one, a case in point against nc state. wolf pack turns it over and trevor couldn'ty is going the other way. he has a high percentage shot. we are tied at 26. second half up to tyler innis, the floater in the paint and won. scoring nine. the orange shooting nine from the field. syracuse late in the game, forcing the turn over. tyler innis comes up with it the syracuse taking the lead. wolfpack with a chance. seven seconds to go. tj dave warren inside the three point line. syracuse unbeaten winning 56-65. the celebration ensues, the orange 25 and 0. meantime florida has been to the elite three-straight times. the gaiters starting four seniors, a tough out. a win. scotty with the three-ball, a
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career high 23. florida in one after the buck ement. patrick young, baby hooks. he had two huge 3-point plays during the crucial play. gaiters with a one-point lead. gaiters tick it out to michael fraser the second. florida beats kentucky 69-59, 17 straight wins, the gators proving 23 and 2. turning to the winter games after a disappointing finish in the downhill and super combined events, bode miller hoped to make amedz in the superk -- amends in the superguilt. bode miller finished -- super-g. bode miller's performance good enough for the bronze. team-mate andrew rib ebbing took the silver. he won the bronze in vancouver. bode miller, the oldest skier, 36, to medal.
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this is his sixth olympic medal. here is a look at the medal count. the usa captured four gold, four silver and eight bronze. norway, canada and the netherlands have 14 medals in the winter games. the usa men's hockey team has little time to celebrate, the americans on the ice facing slovenia in the preliminary round game. boy was it an emotional win over the russians, after a controversial disallowed goal by it russians, this one goes to an eight-round shoot out with tj of the u.s. taking six shots, scoring on four, including the game winner. the match-up is under way. we are in the first period of the united states, leading by a score of 2-0. phil scoring with a minute and four seconds. the united states leading with the win, clinching group 8 and advancing to the
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quarterfinals. that wraps it up for sport. >> well, you just heard it from mark here. tj oshie is the new star. coming from a small town in minneapolis, boasting more than its fair share of olympic stars. we go there. >> they call this hockey up to, usa. since 1956 warrowd produced eight olympic hockey stars, seven medallists. as you learn from banners and signs, two. tj oshie, and gg marvin are in sochi. it's big for a town with fewer than 2,000 people. >> everyone talks about tj and gg and look where they are now and what they are doing. the whole community is proud of them and what they there done. >> hockey is everything here. for decades people loved a game that is not nearly as popular in their country as baseball.
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longer winter is a proud position. isolated location plays their part. >> it's a quiet place to win. not too much traffic. that's all there was to do when i started. >> plenty of excitement at the local arena, as high school bands fire up the crowd. high school girls are defending a winning streak. >> do you have the backing in do you have the coaching, the available ice time? do you have the tradition? i mean, is it possible. can you believe in it. i think they have the right environment. >> henry bouche would agree, winning silver with team usa in japan in 1972. he got a message from his home down in the opening ceremony. >> i remember getting a telegram
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from everybody in the world it was 16 feet long and all the names of the people that i knew from the small town. talk about having a lump in your throat. >> in an age of emails, skype and social media, it's a lot easier to support players who are far away. that's what the people of hockey town will do for the next two weeks two towns, two teams, divided loyalties at the arena. not when team usa takes to the ice in sochi, that's when every player, men and women, is a home town hero. >> talk about home town hero, it may be a sign of good things to come. no men's hockey team won gold without a player. >> and the walking dead - hundreds of zombies ran and
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stumbled through the streets. they had costume, fake wounds. and behinds them the zombie hunters. it kicks off the carnival season in venice. >> here is what is to follow, a guilty verdict in the trial of michael dunn. jurors were locked in the charge of murder but convicted him of attempted murder. >> a ceasefire in the city of homs and today it allowed her hundreds of people to be evacuated from war-torn syria city and one of the only achieves in peace talks in geneva. >> after falling short in the last two olympic games, snow boarder lindsay jacobellis seeks redemption. >> the south-west has record temperatures.
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>> the al jazeera morning news conditions. i'm morgan radford. i'm back with you in 2.5 minutes. don't go anywhere.
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[ chants ] >> murder mistrial. a jury convicts michael dunn of attempted murder. the racially charged case puts florida's stand your ground law in the spotlight again. rioters threw stones at police in venezuela, where the president calls for calm as
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protests continue. >> plus, protests of a glass gage. egypt's deposed president mohamed morsi withdraws from a spy trial. >> and deadly outbreak. emergency vaccinations taking place in kenya after measles spread from child to child. >> good morning to you. welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live from new york city. protesters marched in the streets of jacksonville florida after the verdict in the michael done murder case. they are demanding the resignation of state attorney angela cory. [ chants ] >> the jury convicted dunn of three counts of attempted murder
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and the killing of unarmed accord -- unamend teenager. juries were deadlocked over first degree murder. if puts stand your ground laws back into the spotlight. we are joined from jacksonville, florida. >> the reaction of the davis' are mixed. they were grateful for the conviction and the truth, but would fight for justice for jordan. >> the jury delivered a mixed verdict. deadlocked on the first degree murder charge against 47-year-old michael dunn. they rejected his argument that they feared for his -- that he feared for his life when he fired into an s.u.vl filled with teenagers. the verdict came the day before jordan would have turned 19.
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>> we'll continue to stand and wait for justice for jordan. >> the jury found dunn guilty on second degree murder and shooting into an occupied car. each charge carries with it up to a 30 year sentence, with a 30 year mandatory minimum. we are hope to have a little bit of closurie. >> it's sad for mr dunn, that he will live the rest of his life in that sense of tomorrowent. and i will pray for him. >> he must be remorseful for the killing of my son. >> they'd love to know what the jury thought. the jury refused to speak to reporters following the verdict. >> he's in disbelief. when he sat next to me he
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basically said "how is this happening." the state attorney vowed to retry the first degree murder case. cory is the same prosecutor who tried the george zimmerman case. she did not respond if asked whether the mistrial was proved, that she overcharged in this case, something her office was accused of doing in the george zimmerman case. >> i'm fraud of my office. >> outside the courthouse protesters said the four days of deliberations had them worried about a repeat of george zimmerman's acquittal in the death of trayvon martin, killed nine months before davis. >> relief of a verdict or punishment. but it was not the rite punish the or the person. >> davis's parents hope to have a conviction by their son's birthday. it was not the conviction they hoped for, but they got their risk. >> when asked if he had regrets.
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michael dunn's attorney praised the jury, but with a guilty verdict he says of course he has regret. >> you have been covering the story all along. do you have any idea what is behind the mixed verdict. >> we would like ipp sight. we do know and can infer since the jury - the jury was divided when it came to second degree murder and second degree murder. it cams with an issue of -- comes with an issue of premeditation. >> michael dunn is facing a lot of prison time. the prosecutor is saying he might re try the case, do you have an idea of what is next. is he likely to spend a full term behind bars?
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>> the prosecutor plans to retry the murder case against dunn. she will consult with the family. with the four convictions that done has been convicted of, he is going to spend the rest of his life in prison. >> thank you for being was. >> we have a legal contributor, thank you for being with us again. i want to understand something. the jury was deadlocked on the first degree murder charge. what does that mean they weren't sure of? >> it seems they couldn't decide whether or not this was a premeditated murder or whether or not it was a second degree murder or something less. it's unclear. clearly they were hung up on the stop charge. it's about self-defence. it was the defence - was he
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defending himself against this young man jordan davis or not. >> it brings into question the stand your ground law. >> it really doesn't because ultimate will it wasn't a stand your ground defense. we talk about that a lot in florida, but he didn't assert stand your ground as a preliminary matter, which is what you have to do in a stopped your ground case, and didn't use stand your frowned as a defense. it filters throughout everything in florida. that's how we think, that you can shoot first, and ask later. it is a traditional self-defence case, where he said "i had a right to defend myself in the circumstance, because this young man was reaching for a weapon" stand your frowned is procedural, where you say i don't need to go to trial. he chose not to do it. george zimmerman chose not to do it in ta case here this was good
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old-fashioned defence, and the jury was hung up on that. it kicks up things reminiscent of stand your ground. >> aloha said: >> does this verdict set a dangers precedent for the other 22. >> the real problem in these states and across the country is there's an increasing sense where people have a permit to carry and a culture of shooting first and asking later. there has to be a middle ground, where we don't have to tell our children to be afraid to play their music loudly.
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>> are all children aring to be afraid. >> no. we see an uptake in homicide. most black men are at risk. >> it's 50 jeers since emit tool decide. we have to sit down and have a conversation with young men. i think black families ha a talk. i'm a woman, but my parents had a talk with me. all families, of course, have a conversation about respecting authority. it's different for young plaque boys and in this case. police officers will tell you this that it has given citizens more authority with weapons than it gives to the police.
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the home, you always had a right to protect your castle. but now you have a fright to shoot anywhere where you might feel threatened - in your car, at the shopping mall. >> in is with traditional defence or stand your ground law. >> with stand your ground law. there's a culture that allows people to feel that they can protect the perimeter of their person if they have the right to carry them. >> even if the danger is perceived. >> perceived danger, what is going on in your find. >> jamie floyd, legal contributor for al jazeera. >> protests in venezuela are turning violence. protesters struck back, throwing rocks and setting fire in the streets of the capital of the caracas. opposition rallies are led by students. the president explains the
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leftist unrest. secretary of state john kerry is weighing in saying: >> rich 'em levin has more from caracas. >> singing the national anthem, thousands describe the government's ban on protest, taking to the streets in caracas on saturday. expressing frustration, nicolas maduro, and what is perceived as a crackdown on the opposition. >> we are tired of the governments silencing and discarding us. >> aipt riot police -- antiriot police formed a line. rocks are hurled at the police and chaos and confusion.
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>> people panicked and scared, oning for cover. the situation here is tense. the police fired tear gas, dispersing the crowd. they are saying they will not go. we can see in the distance that people have rocks, they are coming towards the police. this was just the fourth day in a row of violence in the capital. earlier the president held a rally, tens of thousands of supporters that vowed to defend him.
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>> translation: the fascists want to destroy us. >> the hard line leader of the opposition organised the student marches on wednesday. >> you fugitive from justice, hand yourself in. >> as both sides continued, refusing to back down, men wonder what come would return to the streets. >> fro testers are angry about high inflation crime and the lack of basic good. protesters and police clash in the streets of bahrain's capital. earlier in the day an officer died from injuries from a bombing. the protests have been heating up since friday when demonstrators were sprayed with tear gas, whiches trying to rear the roundabout. protesters have been rallying
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for greater political rights and the king to step down. riots groups say that number is high are >> over in ukraine easing of the tensions where anti-government protesters left the site of a 2-month sit in, after authorities freed more than 200 of its colleagues. these are pictures of protesters leaving city hall where they'd been camped out, and another large rally in the capital of kiev getting under way. ukraine has seen mass protests when president viktor yanukovych passed on a deal that would have increased trade and opened the country's borders. >> over in egypt the mistrial of a mohamed morsi has been adjourned until the 23rd. the deposed president appears with 25 others, charged with spying. he protested.
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mohamed morsi was kicked out by the military in scrooul, and accused of -- july and accused of inciting murder. 10 were killed in demonstrations outside the presidential palace. >> mohamed morsi is charged with conspireing with terrorist organizations. prosecutors say mohamed morsi worked with hamas and lebanon's hezbollah. >> two other charges for esca escaping gaol and insulting the judiciary. he could face the death penalty. >> the trial of three al jazeera journalists is due to begin on february 20th. it's part of a group of 20 people charged with links to a banned group. they have all been held for 50 days, accused of having ties to the brotherhood, which egypt declared a terrorist
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organization. abdullah al-shami is on the 18th day of a hunger strike against his i know detention. >> al jazeera continues to demand the unconditional release of his staff. >> three died as a result of storms across the u.k., where many cities flooded and 30 homes in england are without power. >> jennifer glasse is in cornwall in the hard hit south-west of the country. >> how is the community where you are. how are they coping with the floods and are they in for more trouble. >> you know, this is cornwall, the fishing fleet. most of the boats up and down the coast are not in the water, you can see the community is the big effort. they cleaned out the harbour, and this is the first time in the 200-year-old history. it was built in 1825. before there was a proper harbour, you can see it's empty.
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cleaner than when we arrived here. the entire village came out. we have seen it up and down the coast line. here it's been about the wind and ocean. we have seen a lot of flooding, and the somerset levels flood in the winter time for a couple of face or a week. people are very, very - in a desperate situation, and so britain hard hit for weather you mentioned the desperation of people. >> a few days ago prime minister david cameron called in the army they have not needed that much here, because the flooding has not been devastating. they'll need big engineers to
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come in. we have seen elsewhere in central england where the flooding is terrible, the armies come in, emergency services around the country a lot of work has to be done. it will take weeks, if not months for people to return home. >> thank you again. >> meanwhile days of foreign shall rain has caused flooding in croatia. two rivers rose to flood staples not seep in 50 years, causing many roads to be closed and cutting off village from the outside world. the salvation army has been called in. there's flooding issues in the american north-west. let's prick in meteorologist eboni deon. >> we'll look at the rivers represented here on the map.
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there are rivers at the peak of floods. we are watching it chosely, one with moderate flooding. we are expecting more rain to come in to the saturated area. you can see a steady stream of moisture and another storm center that will move north of washington, and it, too, will bring in the threat of rain. it's stoty, but will come in today into misunderstand. it will stick around and we'll see the pattern condition. in the north-east wiping down. we have some snow in the north-east areas of main, here
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is video to show you know. the clouds were out. it hasn't let up just yet. most areas are in the clear. behind the storm system is gusty winds. into the middle of the country, a storm system we are watching. that will create snowy conditions, and that's why we have the advisories up including minneapolis and chicago. >> meanwhile an apology from the lead negotiator in the syrian peace talks. why round two of the discussions failed, and what happened to the in the civilians while we wait for round three. the taliban calling for the removal of all u.s. troops. why president obama is changing his exit strategy. the clean-up on the island of
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java after a volcano spews hot ash and rocks high into the air. ♪ what is this place? where are we? this is where we bring together the fastest internet and the best in entertainment. we call it the x1 entertainment operating system.
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>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live from new york city. still ahead the clean-up in indonesia after the volcanic eruption. >> some areas closing in on records, for those of you north easterners counting down to spring time, we have several weeks before we experience the good warm up. we'll see a warming trend. we have single digits across the treat lakes, as we take a look at what is in store for the week ahead. we'll keep the cold air mass around temperatures at the freezing point. by tuesday we'll deal with snow as temperatures rise. low 40, closer to 50 by the time we hit wednesday. finally, later in the week,
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across the south-east temperatures below '60s. we are expecting to close in on records around las vegas and phoenix. >> turning to the war in syria, where an assess fire in the city of homs. it allowed for hundreds of people to be evacuated. it was one of the only achievements of the peace talks in geneva, which are now tet to enter a third round. many refugees from syria ended up. >> this is how come people are having to live here. this is an open tent. i can tell you it's winter here and it's cold at night. it's raping. there's a lot of mud and people coming with clothes that are not right for that. it's freezing, there's shoes and a lady said give me your shoes, look what i'm wearing, what your children are wearing. i can show you what the camp is like. people are angry and frustrated.
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if you ask them what about geneva, people are treating them like animals, they don't care. why are pol terms sitting at a table. there's a few aid agencies, they are expecting a larger influx. tents are built. there's furnaces handed out to people. i'll show you how a family is living at the moment. they are waiting for a tent over here, and it's basining. people are saying with the rain a lot of mattresses they are gip is wet. it -- given is wet. it doesn't try there's no sun. a lot of anger. people are treated like animals and nobody cares. >> stefanie dekker reporting from the lebanese-syrian border. >> afghans are marking 25 years since soviet forces withdrew from the country. the taliban using the occasion
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to call on the taliban to rid the country of all troops. >> the taliban saying ta -- that: >> towns in indonesia are cleaning up. the army banned residents living within six miles of mt kelud due to safety returns. >> volcanic activity has gone down, airports are starting to reopen. the island of java, they were closed for two days, disrupting travel of millions of papi passengers. authorities are facing a major clean-up operation with thick
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layers of ash covering cities and villages. >> we are here with 41 soldiers, as you can see our troops are trying to clean up the public streets. not only is volcanic ash bad for the health, it's affect ght the respiratory system. causing accidents. >> more than 70,000 people are staying in evacuation centres. in the next few days it will be clear if the mountain calmed down enough for them to go home. >> syria's refugee crisis gets worse, causing one country to question its own immigration policy, it was a busy week in politics, and president obama science the debt sealing agrees into law. some say it shows a weakness in g.o.p. and strategists from both sides of the island will weigh in. >> i'm mark morgan, will the usa men's hockey team have a let done offer the win over russia,
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i'll have more on that. >> and more medals for americans in
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>> good morning welcome back. you are walling al jazeera america, and i'm mad fofrt here are the top stories. protesters march in the streets of jacksonville florida after a controversial verdict in the michael dunn murder case. a jury convicted dunn on three counts of attempted murder and the killing of unarmed teen jordan davis. over loud music coming from jordan davis's car. the jury was deadlocked on first degree murder. it puts stand your ground law in the spotlight.
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>> more than 1,000 people have taken to the streets in venezuela. >> today the governor in homs asking for an extension to allow hundreds of resist dents to get out of harm's way. >> it was a busy week in politics. the major news. president obama extending a bill. investors are nerve ourks the date the u.s. treasury would have lost borrowing authority. after a tight vote in the house and a push to get the bill through the senate, a default has been averted. joining us is republican strategist and democratic strategist david jones. >> let's dump into it. let's look at the debt sealing. hos speaker john boehner pushed for a clean bill. pushing it through this quickly,
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did it help or hurt the go. op. >> it helped the g.o.p. to during this out and repeat the disaster last fall with the shutdown would have hurt our party. we said let's pass this and move on to concentrating on the failures of obama administration, his low approval ratings, during it out, meaning focus on the republican inability to get down what people expect condress to do, keeping -- congress to do, keeping america funding and going. >> do you agree? >> i agree with that, it's a good assessment. it was a smart move by john boehner, but an important thing to notice about the vote is there's a civil war going on. the speaker got 28 votes out of his own republican conference to pass the debt ceiling the number of members of the republican
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conference voted for default for this country. it's important for vestors to see. the republicans from able to mustier 28 votes for the debt ceiling and the democratic party voted in mass to support the full faith and credit of the united states. so wall street should be looking to the democratic party to thank them for the economic situation that we are in. we weren't in last time. i agree with you, john boehner made the right move and outside of that, john boehner is not going to be speaker in 2015 because he alienated am all tea party members. >> what do you think about the civil war in the tea party? >> i think that is overly strong. john boehner got enough votes to pass the bill and mitch
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mcconnell got enough votes to defeat the filibuster. the republicans were needed in order to raise the debt ceiling. >> i'll move on to the domestic area. much ado has been made about the president's executive push in the final year of his term. in 2008 as a senator he said: >> how does what the president is trying to do now. how is it different to what push tried to do a few years ago. >> tell me who the republican party is, speaker john boehner, mitch mcconnellel who is running for his life, rand paul, grover nor quist. who do you negotiate with. speaker john boehner certainly doesn't have the powering of
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himself. i'd say eric cantor has more power. mcconnell is running for his life. there is no republican party that can be negotiated with. >> you think congress forced him into that position. boris, has he had his arm twisted. has the republican party blocked anything that he tried to go, even when the american polls suggest he's behind on issues. >> they have shown an ability to negotiate. we saw that on the fiscal cliff. they didn't give you an answer. president obama can add this to a long list of things that he said he would do. once he got to office. it's easy to criticise the senator. it's harder to govern, and president obama found that time and time again. what he's doing is the tame
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thing as president bush. the president is going backward. he found that it's easier to do it himself and he's going forward making those decisions and should expect the same sort of vitrial. to say there's no one negotiating is wrong. you saw this week republicans push through the ability to raise the debt ceiling that president obama signed. this week we have a perfect amp of president bush working with congress, with the senate. >> they are working with him because they knew how bad of a blow back they got when they saw it the first time. would you say it was atvent ageous as they go through the rebranding process. >> that's what it is. >> david, what are your thoughts? >> that's what the republican party needs.
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after 2012 in the senate the democrats were supposed to lose control. the republicans won in states like missouri or indiana, where they had no business winning. they won them because of what the republican party put up. their problems are within. their toughest candidates are opponents within. it's their own party, eating their own. >> we have been spending time on the republican party. i would love to hear your thoughts. critics are reporting that president obama will be going to someone's house next month. >> the democrats will put their chips on hillary clinton. in '08 she was the nominee, her campaign imploded because she
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was impossible to run a focussed campaign. the democrats should look outside of hillary clinton, because it's not a definite she'll decide to run, and it's not a definite that she'll come out of the primaries or not be defeated. as far as the republican party goes, we should not discount the parties, it's a large spectrum party. do you think it's a sure thing. >> the democratic parties has a defense. it has joe biden. >> we are talking about - what does the republican have. >> it has martin omallee. who does the republican party have. rand pull, ted cruz. >> the fact that you start with joe biden, who has under 1% in the caucuses in 2008 is a joke. >> the joke we are still waiting to see what happens in the next election thank you very much.
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republican strategist david jops joining us from washington d.c. it's my measure. >> a small town in sweden has become a safe haven due to open-door policy. that policy is now being questioned. >> mohammed was on the verge of adult life. he was poised to start a new job. it's feared he would be arrested like his cousins after knowning through classes. >> we had to start from scratch again. eye adopting a new society, country, laws. >> mohammed is one of thousands
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of syrian, the country has a long history of anticipating immigrants -- accepting immigrants. >> 90,000 citizens, 30,000 are immigrants. that puts strains on local services. that's the big problem. i would say, for the refugees. they all stay with relatives. the fell rings for a successful deal. the european union found the project provide training and jobs for immigrants. down the hall is a class for gardeners with lessons on how to keep accounts. >> schools have had to fire extra counsellors to keep with the number of children traumatised by war. of the 800 students at the roma school, 99% have an imfront background.
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>> it is schools like that that fuelled support. they hold 20 of parliament's 349 seats. they are unabashedly anti-immigrant. they want to lower immigration to 90%. people from syria get permanent residency automatically, which is irresponsible. support for restrictions is growing. the swedish democratic party wants to stop the open-arms policy, more and more are joining them, hoping to increase the vote coming up in the autumn. pash - >> good morning everyone, the usa men's hockey team fresh off a win over russia facing
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slovenia in a final group play. the second period is underway. the americans led 3-0. phil kessler has all three goals for the u.s. after disappointing finishes in the men's downhill and supercombined american skier bode miller hoped to make amends in the super-g. he completed his fifth winter games. he competed early and watched competitors. he was good enough for the bronze. his team-mate took the silver. widebrick won the bronze in the super-g four years ago. at page 36 bode miller the oldest alpine skier to medal. his sixth. >> lindsay j ajs cobellis of the u.s. looked for redemption. she had a lead in the final in tourin and faltered. in van koouf area she made it --
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van ooufer she made the silver. >> today she crashed and didn't make it to the final. now to the medal count: >> let's head to campus. march madness a few weeks away and the number one seeds in the n.c.a.a. tournament up for grabs. compelling games around the country. number one syracuse, the orange, still unbeaten and making a habit of surviving the close ones. a case in point last fight. the wolf pack turning it over. orange going the other way and trevor couldn'ty makes -- cooney makes sure we are died.
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tyler innis with the noter and the foul, only with nine points. syracuse forcing a turn over. they are down one. cg fair at the ordinary ent. syracuse takes the lead by one. gabriel vasconcelos ferreira with 11 -- fair with is 1. >> tj war ip inside the 3- -- warren inside the 3-point line. orange 25 and 0. >> florida been to the elite eight three straight times. gaiters with four seniors. last night an impressive win in lex iping tonne kentucky. the -- lexington, kentucky. 23 points, florida within one. patrick young and the foul. two huge plays. spurred by florida, less than five minutes to play. kicked out to michael fraser the third much florida leads doyle
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kennon 59-69. 17-straight wins. florida improves to 23 and 2. >> maryland taken on with the turks move to the big 10, the last scheduled game. jake layman no. nick fals yes. it's a put-back dunk. >> des wells - i think his foot is behind the line. he it -- he had 17. this is one reason or two that he has to go to the n.b.a., don't put the blue delves up by one. last seconds for maryland watch this. this is for the win. dan mitchell down low. how does that not go in. it doesn't. it bounces around. duke escapes 69 and 67. that's a look at sports. >> not to be stopped.
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thank you so much. an outbreak of measles forcing some sick children to be quarantined. we are shown what officials do to stop it. >> this woman greaves for her son. she buried him on thursday. he was sick since an infant. he got measles, it weakened his immune system he could not fight a pneumonia attack. she only has a daughter now. >> translation: he was my only son, i have no husband. i thought he would be the one one day to get us out of here. now he's gone. >> sick children have to be quarantined inside this tent. the outbreak of measles has been worsened by the flow of refugees from south sudan. >> when you deal with a
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situation where many are coming into a camp, a public health concern is a measles outbreak. the important thing is we are identifying the measles cases and are responding. >> 2-year-old twins were admitted two weeks agos. their mother noted the symptoms. >> they were feverish, eyes red, a rash and weak. >> now every child under is a years in the camp is being targeted in an emergency vaccination that began on wednesday. 50,000 in all. >> it's an exercise that is going to extend beyond the boundaries of the camp to the kenyan community, and right to the border with south sudan, where the refugees are coming from. >> the refugees at the border have been vaccinated against polio and measles, they are not clear. they have to be screened for a
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second time when they get to the karm, monitored and vaccinated. containing the spread of the disease is the number one priority. humanitarians admit it's a task. >> banks get the green light to offer services to legal pot sellers. just after the break an expert tells us why this could be the beginning of making marijuana legal. >> and rain is falling in the north-west. deepwater horizon is here to tell us about it -- eboni deon is here to tell us about it. >> i'll tell you how much the region is expected to see in the weekend ahead.
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. just ahead, is the marijuana
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business getting more legitimate. first a look at the forecast with meteorologist deepwater horizon. >> we are going to deal with more snow back into the midwest. that's right, you guessed it, a bit of a break. we are now watching for another storm system to get going as we head into this evening. snow showers mainly, but possibly dealing with freezing rain as we get into the overnight hours. minneapolis impacted by the storm system, we have the latest winter storm winding down in the north-east. more onshore into, rain and snow. >> the obama administration has given the go ahead for banks to do business with marijuana sellers in states where pot is legal. weed entre prepures will be able to -- entre prepures will be able to stash away their
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savings, pay payroll. despite the industry generating billions, many bank did not want to touch t. >> we have gone a tiny fraction for banks to feel comfortable proifing the service. >> -- providing the service. >> it's a huge development. these business has been up until now forced to operate in a cash op. >> banks could be rewarded. according to a market research firm the legal pot industry could reach $2.5 million. for more on the perspective of the size let's look at the map. in colorado, and washington state. marijuana can be purchased for recreational purposes. in 20 states, including columbia, marijuana can be brought for meddizinal purposes. aaron smith, cofounder and
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director of the national cannabis industry association, joins us from phoenix. >> why is this such a big deal? >> for the first time the federal government and banking regulators created a roadmap for financial institutions to do business. that means that our members that are operating like ordinary businesses that have been unable to access checking accounts will have access to them. we are pleased with the decision on this. let's look at the chart. it shows that the legal ma'amming market is lucrative and growing fast. according to market research in 2013, legal margear sales reached 1.43 billion, and a year
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later they reach 2.5 billion. by 2018 appual sales reach 10.2 billion as more states legalize pot. what does that mean for the economy. >> this is one of the fastest growing industries in the country, if not the fastest growing in the country, and what that means is taking a product that was already widely available and pulling it out of the criminal market, out of the hands of drug dealers, this is what the voters want and what is right for public safety, any bank that decides to do business with the industry, following the guidance is standing to gain a bit. >> you mptioned public safety and the financial factor.
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but is there a downside. >> there's no down sigh. i believe the guyance was the -- guidance was the first step. we need congress to act and think banking regulations to provide clarity to financial institutions. ultimately we need congress to end federal marijuana prohibition so federal law is in harmony with the will of the voters which no longer want to see people going to gaol for marijuana. >> erin smith, cofounder and executive director of the analogistal cannabis industry association. joining us from phoenix arizona. hackers broke into fundraising website and stolen user data. kick starter didn't say how many accounts were compromised. kick starter enables online donations for individuals funding creative projects. directors used the site and the
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company is encouraging viewers to change their passwords. >> crowds of visitors are making their way to south-east china's typa zoo to catch a glimpse of the club. they are drawing huge numbers of crowds. 68,000 people are visiting the zoo on february the 2nd, marking the highest number of visitors. it is sfected to generate 16 million u.s. for the city this year alone. >> that is it for this edition of al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live in new york city. more news in 2 minutes. don't go anywhere.
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>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america i'm morgan radford live from new york city. here are the top stories we are following. breaking news out of egypt. state tv is reporting that a
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bomb attack on a tourist bus killed three people. the attack took place in the sinai peninsula near the border of israel. a partial z verdict has been reached in the trial of michael dunn. he was convicted of attempted murder, but not murder. >> protests in vns turned violent. police used tear gas and water canons against demonstrators. they struck back, throwing rocks and fire into the streets. >> the prime minister is blaming the country's leftest eleat and the united states. >> over in egypt, the trial of mohamed morsi has been adjourned until the 23rd. the president, along with 35 others appeared in court charged with spying. mohamed morsi's attorney protested the glass case surrounding the defendant, caming they would not be able to
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hear inside. mohamed morsi was kicked out by the military in july. italy is without a prime minister. the country's president is expected to nominate the mayor of florence. the former leader was forced out by his own party, the third to fall within three years. i'm morgan radford. it's the american dream, a good job, a home for your family, a better future for your children. somewhere along the way, that reality. >> paycheck to paycheck. enough? treadmill. >> to keep middle class families from falling behind. >> people are struggling today. >> their struggle is the story of today's america, a country that counts on those in the middle to lead on the path to prosperity.

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